(Source: helenamanning8)

Anonymous asked: In your Sansa Stark video you said that Sansa is the eldest living Stark and that confused me for a second because I was like no Jon Snow is still alive but then I realized that not everyone is as adamant about Jon counting as one of the Starks as I am.

claudiaboleyn:

I only meant from a political standpoint :)

Jon Snow isn’t going to be in line to inherit anything because he’s a bastard. In terms of politics, Sansa is the eldest of the Stark family, which is why she’s being held by the Lannisters and nobody seems to bother about poor Jon.

He counts as a Stark to me too, but unfortunately (or fortunately) for him, he doesn’t to the Lannisters. 

xxx

Also, as a member of the Nights Watch, he would have had to forfeit any titles and claims.

flightcub:

totalitarian dystopian future lit is like “what if the government got so powerful that all the bad stuff that’s already happening ALSO HAPPENED TO WHITE PEOPLE?”

popculturebrain:

Leading Men Age, Leading Women Don’t | Vulture

There are more charts if you click through.

chronicwithcats:

deliciousdannydevito:

shoutout to young adults with debilitating conditions who feel like their lives are stagnant or regressing, while everyone else moves forward

we’re gonna be ok

needed this right now, that’s exactly what’s getting to me

(Source: primadollly)

People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her.

Valar Morghulis

(Source: oberynmatell)

The US Government:We're not going to make it federally mandatory for people to get paid a wage they can actually live off of
The US Government:If people want to make a living, they'll just have to work 16+ hours a day
The US Government:And if their kids end up disenfranchised because of a lack of parental involvement, well that's not our problem
The US Government:In fact, what is our problem is creating a system that will funnel these disenfranchised youth into our prison system so they can work for corporations (that promise us money) for damn near free
The US Government:If they don't want to fall victim to this system, then they can seek higher education
The US Government:Except such an education will be inaccessible to most disenfranchised people and skewed in favor of the financially stable and white people
The US Government:And we're not going to make intervention programs like sex education and conflict resolution federally mandatory, because that's the parent's job
The US Government:The parent who is working 16 hours a day

In episode 10, there’s a nice, private moment that Ward has with Coulson - they’re in Lola, and I think they’re going to see a Centipede soldier’s sister, and they’re just having a conversation, finally, about their personal lives. Coulson brings up that he had someone in his past, a cellist, and that he had dinners at The Richmond, and that’s something that comes up later - that’s a tool Raina uses to help coerce Coulson to get into the machine in episode 11.

And then in “Seeds,” there’s really nice moment where Skye is standing at the wall of valor, and we hear Coulson’s voice off-camera saying that the world is full of evil, pain, lies and death - and the camera pans and lands on Ward when he says “lies” and “evil.” [x]

(Source: roza-belikova)

In the end, Captain America does not make the heroic sacrifice, thus further proving that Black Widow can handle the emotional weight of being a lead character. As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from here heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice.